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Temperature in Denmark

Denmark has a relatively warm climate compared to other geographic areas at the same latitude. As comparison, it is much colder in both the southern part of Hudson Bay in Canada and Siberia in Russia although both areas are at the same latitude as Denmark. The relatively warm climate is due to the warm North Atlantic Drift which originates in the tropical seas off the U.S. east coast.

Average annual temperature for the entire country is 7.7°C (average 1961-90), ranging from 7.4°C in central Jutland to 8.4°C degrees at some coasts.

Annual mean temperature in Denmark since 1873. Values are calculated national average based on a number of selected stations. The curve in bold shows 9 years Gaussian Filtered values. Like global temperatures, a clear increase is seen in the annual mean temperature. Data is published in DMI's technical report series.

The ten warmest years were seen from the 1930’s and up until now. In fact, ever since 1988, almost every year has turned out warmer than normal ("normal" is defined as the average for the time period 1961-90) and average land temperature has increased significantly during recent decades.

DMI statistics show that average mean temperature since 1990 has been approx. 8.5°C.

Since 1870, the temperature in Denmark has increased by approx. 1.5°C.

Denmark has a relatively warm climate compared to other geographic areas at the same latitude. Photo Claus Kern-Hansen.

By John Cappelen and Anne Mette K. Jørgensen (ret.)

For further information contact John Cappelen, jc@dmi.dk

Edited by Niels Hansen, translated by Marianne Brandt, kommunikation@dmi.dk